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Category Archives: Troubleshooting



How to Overcome Common Objections from Prospects

 

Sales professionals face many challenges, but perhaps the most daunting is how to handle the objections of prospects. Stumbling blocks can be encountered at any stage of the process–from the gatekeeper on the initial cold-call, or much later, after a proposal has been submitted and presented. Here are a few of the most common objections, and how to deal with them: The gatekeeper, for example, might inform you that “We’re happy with our current provider,” or “We’re not looking right now.” You could respond by informing the gatekeeper that you are working with several other companies in her industry, and you stopped by to introduce yourself so that, when the time comes, you will be an option for her company Learn More.

 

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The challenges of a struggling enterprise for a new Vice President

 

Few challenges rival the complexity of turning around a troubled enterprise, but the newly-hired VP of sales need not stumble around in the dark. Prudent guidelines are available to help navigate the battered ship out of troubled waters. To begin with, the VP must immediately obtain the “lay of the land”: Are the financials of the company so dire that bankruptcy looms? Who are the firm’s primary customers, and are those accounts in jeopardy? Which product lines are performing, and which are not? How effective is the marketing department? What is the condition of the supply chain? Are there customer service issues to address? Is the business languishing because of low morale? What financial resources are available, and to what Learn More.

 

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Beware the decline of morale

 

Virtually every sales team is susceptible to morale problems, but vigilant leadership can minimize the frequency of attitude decline, and the toll that it takes. Although the general outlook of a sales team—its collective attitude and tendency toward optimism or pessimism–is difficult to quantify, it is apparent that morale can make or break an enterprise. Consequently, declining morale must be addressed and corrected in short order. The most astute executive forges their own workplace culture, and keeps a finger on the “psychological pulse” of their sales team. They are keenly aware of the potential sources of morale problems. Quite often, a single individual is responsible for declining morale. An incompetent or dictatorial manager, for instance, is a menace to the Learn More.

 

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Dealing With a Sales Team That Comes in Under Quota

 

A sales management team may have to deal with the issue of representatives at their company coming in under quota, despite the fact that they are putting in a significant amount of effort to try and reverse this trend. Managers may be puzzled as to why their salespeople are reporting low numbers, but this is now their problem and making this determination is part of the reason they were asked to take that position. The sales manager has to find the answer as to why sales reps are not meeting quota by sitting down and examining the approach that they took and the methods they used in an effort to make the sale. Working hard does not mean that they’re Learn More.

 

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Is Your NBA Center Only 5’2”?

 

As a national sales assessment and sales training company, one of the most common requests we receive from sales managers and directors are requests to teach their sales people how to handle rejection. Our question back to them is always the same. Are you sure your salespeople are capable of handling rejection? There are two types of sales skills: hard skills and personal skills. Hard skills include things that can be taught, such as product and industry knowledge, or how to prospect for business or qualify a buyer. Personal skills are more cognitive and motivation-based. They include things such as using common sense, self-management, self-direction, handling direction, empathy, and self image. Hard skills are observable. You can follow a salesperson Learn More.

 

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